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Bicycle Friendly Community Public Survey

To support Batavia's application to continue being recognized as a Bicycle Friendly Community, we want to hear from residents, local area bicyclists, and bike advocates about your experiences and perceptions of bicycling in the community!

 

Click here or use the QR code below to enter the survey.

30.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Common Causes for Collisions with Bicycle The average cyclists can easily reach speeds of 10-15 mph. A car can reach much higher speeds than the average bicycle, and motorists often underestimate a cyclist’s speed. Collisions with bicycles are often a result. Intersections are the most common place for a cyclist to be involved in an injury causing collision(1). These collisions result from either underestimating the cyclist’s speed or not seeing the cyclist in the roadway. These scenarios include the Drive Out (or Right Cross), the Left Cross, and the Right Hook. The accompanying image highlights each of these situations and provides defensive driving tips for cyclists. Additional causes of vehicle-bicycle collisions include the Sideswipe (car passing too close), Rear Ending (car following too close), and Dooring (opening car door into path of cyclist). In the US, distracted driving resulted in a 30% rise in cyclist fatalities in the US from 2005 to 2010(2). A study by the NHTSA found that looking away from the road for as little as 2 seconds was enough time to significantly increase accident risk(3). Over the time it takes (5 seconds) to read or send a text, at 30mph a driver will cover 220 feet (3/4 the length of a football field) with their eyes off the road! Expecting to see cyclists on the road and knowing how to safely travel the roads with them will create much safer roads in our community. (1) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic Safety Facts 2012: A Compilation of Motor Vehicle Crash Data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System. Publication DOT HS 812 032. U.S. Department of Transportation, n.d. https://ift.tt/2QBiBXL. (2) Klauer, S. G., Dingus, T. A., Neale, V. L., Sudweeks, J. D., & Ramsey, D. J. (2006). The impact of driver inattention on near-crash/crash risk (3) NHTSA. Distracted Driving. https://ift.tt/3e8ohkV #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
29.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
1 Comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB What is Dooring? Anywhere street parking is permitted, dooring is a concern for cyclists. Dooring occurs when a motorist suddenly and quickly opens the door in the path of the cyclist causing the cyclist to crash into the door. Even if the cyclist attempts to swerve to miss hitting the door, there may not be enough time to fully clear the door. Swerving also puts the cyclist at risk of being hit by traffic. Dooring a cyclist always results in injury to the cyclist and can even be fatal(1). An easy way to avoid dooring a cyclist is by practicing what is known as the Dutch Reach. To perform the Dutch Reach, the occupant of the vehicle (driver or passenger) uses the far hand to open the door. Using the far hand forces the occupant to look over their shoulder as they open the door and also prevents the door from being thrown open. As of 2019, the Dutch Reach is part of the Illinois Rules of the Road and taught to every new driver(2). If you do not currently use the Dutch Reach (https://ift.tt/3gP4qbW) when exiting your vehicle, start today! The more you do it, the more it will become second nature and ultimately it may save someone’s life. (1) Greenfield, J. (2018, Sept. 06). 2 Cyclists Killed and Critically Injured in 2 Days Shows Need for More Dooring Awareness. StreetsBlogChicago. https://ift.tt/3dZ8kNM (2) HB5143, 100th General Assembly (IL 2018). https://ift.tt/32X18LR #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
28.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Passing Cyclists on the Road As a motorist, there will be times when you encounter a cyclist travelling in the lane in front of you. Whether the cyclist is travelling in the right-hand side of the lane or closer to the center, passing the cyclist is permitted when safe and legal to do so. The motorist must not exceed the posted speed limit when passing and, according to Illinois law, must also pass at a minimum distance of 3 feet from the cyclist. If oncoming traffic or other obstacles prevent you from providing the 3 foot minimum distance, you must remain behind the cyclist at a safe distance. In a no passing zone, Illinois law does allow motorists to pass cyclists when the cyclists are travelling at less than half of the posted speed limit. Again, the motorists cannot exceed the posted speed limit when passing and still must provide the 3 foot minimum distance from the cyclist. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
27.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Cyclists are Vulnerable Road Users While bicycles are considered vehicles under Illinois law, a bicycle is far different from other vehicles on the road. The average weight of a bicycle ranges from 20-30lbs, but the average weight of a car is around 4,000lbs! Also, the driver of a bicycle sits on top of their vehicle while most other vehicles safely enclose their drivers inside. This puts bicycle riders in a much more vulnerable position compared to other road users. When looking at distance traveled by road user type, cyclists have been shown to have fatality rates 3-10.2 times higher than motorists(1). In 2019, there were 846 cyclists killed and 49,000 injured across the US(2). Early estimates of cycling deaths in the US for 2020 are 697 individuals(3). Many of these deaths could have been prevented through a combination of education and awareness. (1) Bluejay, M. Bicycle Safety Almanac. https://ift.tt/2QXXnD4 (2) National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2020, December). Overview of motor vehicle crashes in 2019. (Traffic Safety Facts Research Note. Report No. DOT HS 813 060). National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. (3) Fox, M. & Whelan, L. (2021, January 29) What We Learned from Tracking Cycling Deaths for a Year. Outside Online. https://ift.tt/3eAy2XV #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
26.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Motorists and Cyclists Even if you don’t personally ride a bicycle, you should be familiar with the Illinois Bicycle Rules of the Road. By understanding the rights and requirements of cyclists on the road, motorists will know what to expect when they encounter a cyclist. In addition, the 2020 Illinois Rules of the Road provides important information for motorists as they navigate Illinois roadways in the presence of cyclists (pages 42-44). The most important take-a-way is that a cyclist is legally allowed to ride on the road and should be treated as any other vehicle you may encounter. In your daily driving, you encounter a variety of different vehicles: cars, trucks, vans, etc. A bicycle is just another type of vehicle that is used to move people from one place to another! #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
23.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB How Are You Visible? Today, share what makes you visible. Let’s see those lights, reflectors, etc. that makes everyone take notice and helps to ensure you have a safe ride. What do you recommend to your fellow cyclists to be visible and stay safe? #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
21.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Wear Light Colored Or Reflective Clothing :: When headed out for a bicycle ride during the day, consider wearing light colored clothing. White and yellow clothing has been shown to provide greater visibility of daytime cyclists and detection by motorists compared to darker colors (such as grey and black)(1). Fluorescent colored clothing provides maximum daytime visibility and detection, with fluorescent red, orange and yellow colors being the most effective1. Fluorescent high-vis clothing reflects the light from the sun allowing it to be highly visible during daylight. Once night falls, light colored and fluorescent clothing no longer provide a benefit for visibility. Under these conditions, reflective clothing will increase the visibility of cyclists by reflecting light from vehicle headlights and other light sources. When looking for reflective clothing options, look for items with large reflective areas. The American National Standards Institute recommends the minimum reflective area for road crew on roads less than 50mph be at least 201 in2 (12in X 16.75in)(2). While fewer cyclists ride after dark, the highest rate of cycling related fatalities occurs during this time(3). Whether you are an avid or recreational cyclist, if you plan on riding after sunset, you should consider adding a reflective vest or jacket to your cycling gear. (1) Kwan, I., & Mapstone, J. (2004). Visibility aids for pedestrians and cyclists: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 36(3), 305-312. (2) SafetyGear Corporation. Explaining the Classes of an ANSI Safety Vest. https://ift.tt/32A4bcx (3) Jaermark, S., Gregersen, N. P., Linderoth, B. 1991. The use of bicycle lights #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
20.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Use Bike Reflectors, Reflective Tape, and Reflective Bands :: There are a variety of visibility aids available to cyclists to help increase their detection by motorists. Reflectors are the most basic of these aids and bicycles are required under CPSC guidelines to have a clear front reflector, red rear reflector, pedal reflectors, and wheel-mounted side reflectors. While the standard reflectors are a good start to making a cyclist visible, they should not be the only tool relied on for visibility. Reflective tape is an easy way to significantly increase your visibility on the road, especially at night. For maximum effectiveness and greatest visibility, reflective tape should be applied to the rear frame of the bike (1). In addition, reflective bands that can be attached to your lower leg/ankle can provide additional visibility. The benefit of these bands comes from their placement – in a location of consistent movement. The movement of a cyclist’s legs creates a distinct, recognizable motion that when illuminated at night allows for motorists to more quickly see the cyclist and react accordingly (2). 1. Costa, M., Bonetti, L., Bellelli, M., Lantieri, C., Vignali, V., & Simone, A. (2017). Reflective tape applied to bicycle frame and conspicuity enhancement at night. Human factors, 59(3), 485-500. 2. Wood, J. M., Tyrrell, R. A., Marszalek, R., Lacherez, P., Carberry, T., & Chu, B. S. (2012). Using reflective clothing to enhance the conspicuity of bicyclists at night. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 45, 726-730. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
19.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Be Seen! :: When you are riding in the presence of motorists, it is crucial that you know the motorist sees you. Whenever possible, make eye contact with the driver and be aware of the driver’s blind spots. Even if you have the right of way, don’t assume it is safe to proceed. Researchers have identified a troubling phenomenon called “looked-but-failed-to-see” (LBFTS) crashes where a driver reports never seeing the cyclist even when they have looked right at them1. Due to the speed at which a vehicle travels, the driver needs to process all of the visual data in a very short amount of time. Researchers suggest that drivers don’t see cyclists because their brain has been conditioned to only look for other motorists. The incidence of LBFTS crashes has been found to increase with driver experience (1). The more we drive the more our brain learns to focus on the most dangerous aspects of driving (cars) filtering out other “less important” information (e.g. cyclists and pedestrians). On the positive side, researchers have shown that motorists who also cycle are more likely to see and react to cyclists on the road (2). So the more time you spend on your bike, the more likely you will notice other cyclists when you are the motorist. The more we all see and recognize cyclists on the road, the safer everyone can travel. Ride Illinois is offering yard signs to help spread this message. If you are interested in a sign for your yard, visit their Start Seeing Bicycles page for more information. (1) Herslund, M. B., & Jørgensen, N. O. (2003). Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 35(6), 885-891. (2) Robbins, C. J., & Chapman, P. (2018). Drivers’ visual search behavior toward vulnerable road users at junctions as a function of cycling experience. Human factors, 60(7), 889-901. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
16.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Show Us Your Helmet! :: Wearing a bike helmet can get a bad rap. Some people may feel it’s “not cool” or that a helmet will “ruin my hair.” In reality, wearing a bike helmet and sporting helmet hair is cool! Today, share your cool helmet look below. We look forward to seeing all of you in the community enjoying your bike ride in style and safety! #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad

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Bike Safety Quiz

Whether you are a cyclist or a motorist, learn more about bike safety by taking the Ride Illinois online Bike Safety Quiz.

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