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Bicycle Friendly Community Public Survey

To support Batavia's application to continue being recognized as a Bicycle Friendly Community, we want to hear from residents, local area bicyclists, and bike advocates about your experiences and perceptions of bicycling in the community!

 

Click here or use the QR code below to enter the survey.

21.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Wear Light Colored Or Reflective Clothing :: When headed out for a bicycle ride during the day, consider wearing light colored clothing. White and yellow clothing has been shown to provide greater visibility of daytime cyclists and detection by motorists compared to darker colors (such as grey and black)(1). Fluorescent colored clothing provides maximum daytime visibility and detection, with fluorescent red, orange and yellow colors being the most effective1. Fluorescent high-vis clothing reflects the light from the sun allowing it to be highly visible during daylight. Once night falls, light colored and fluorescent clothing no longer provide a benefit for visibility. Under these conditions, reflective clothing will increase the visibility of cyclists by reflecting light from vehicle headlights and other light sources. When looking for reflective clothing options, look for items with large reflective areas. The American National Standards Institute recommends the minimum reflective area for road crew on roads less than 50mph be at least 201 in2 (12in X 16.75in)(2). While fewer cyclists ride after dark, the highest rate of cycling related fatalities occurs during this time(3). Whether you are an avid or recreational cyclist, if you plan on riding after sunset, you should consider adding a reflective vest or jacket to your cycling gear. (1) Kwan, I., & Mapstone, J. (2004). Visibility aids for pedestrians and cyclists: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 36(3), 305-312. (2) SafetyGear Corporation. Explaining the Classes of an ANSI Safety Vest. https://ift.tt/32A4bcx (3) Jaermark, S., Gregersen, N. P., Linderoth, B. 1991. The use of bicycle lights #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
20.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Use Bike Reflectors, Reflective Tape, and Reflective Bands :: There are a variety of visibility aids available to cyclists to help increase their detection by motorists. Reflectors are the most basic of these aids and bicycles are required under CPSC guidelines to have a clear front reflector, red rear reflector, pedal reflectors, and wheel-mounted side reflectors. While the standard reflectors are a good start to making a cyclist visible, they should not be the only tool relied on for visibility. Reflective tape is an easy way to significantly increase your visibility on the road, especially at night. For maximum effectiveness and greatest visibility, reflective tape should be applied to the rear frame of the bike (1). In addition, reflective bands that can be attached to your lower leg/ankle can provide additional visibility. The benefit of these bands comes from their placement – in a location of consistent movement. The movement of a cyclist’s legs creates a distinct, recognizable motion that when illuminated at night allows for motorists to more quickly see the cyclist and react accordingly (2). 1. Costa, M., Bonetti, L., Bellelli, M., Lantieri, C., Vignali, V., & Simone, A. (2017). Reflective tape applied to bicycle frame and conspicuity enhancement at night. Human factors, 59(3), 485-500. 2. Wood, J. M., Tyrrell, R. A., Marszalek, R., Lacherez, P., Carberry, T., & Chu, B. S. (2012). Using reflective clothing to enhance the conspicuity of bicyclists at night. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 45, 726-730. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
19.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Be Seen! :: When you are riding in the presence of motorists, it is crucial that you know the motorist sees you. Whenever possible, make eye contact with the driver and be aware of the driver’s blind spots. Even if you have the right of way, don’t assume it is safe to proceed. Researchers have identified a troubling phenomenon called “looked-but-failed-to-see” (LBFTS) crashes where a driver reports never seeing the cyclist even when they have looked right at them1. Due to the speed at which a vehicle travels, the driver needs to process all of the visual data in a very short amount of time. Researchers suggest that drivers don’t see cyclists because their brain has been conditioned to only look for other motorists. The incidence of LBFTS crashes has been found to increase with driver experience (1). The more we drive the more our brain learns to focus on the most dangerous aspects of driving (cars) filtering out other “less important” information (e.g. cyclists and pedestrians). On the positive side, researchers have shown that motorists who also cycle are more likely to see and react to cyclists on the road (2). So the more time you spend on your bike, the more likely you will notice other cyclists when you are the motorist. The more we all see and recognize cyclists on the road, the safer everyone can travel. Ride Illinois is offering yard signs to help spread this message. If you are interested in a sign for your yard, visit their Start Seeing Bicycles page for more information. (1) Herslund, M. B., & Jørgensen, N. O. (2003). Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 35(6), 885-891. (2) Robbins, C. J., & Chapman, P. (2018). Drivers’ visual search behavior toward vulnerable road users at junctions as a function of cycling experience. Human factors, 60(7), 889-901. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
16.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Show Us Your Helmet! :: Wearing a bike helmet can get a bad rap. Some people may feel it’s “not cool” or that a helmet will “ruin my hair.” In reality, wearing a bike helmet and sporting helmet hair is cool! Today, share your cool helmet look below. We look forward to seeing all of you in the community enjoying your bike ride in style and safety! #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
15.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Life of a Helmet:: Now that you have a helmet, it is important to understand that it does not last forever. Despite how well you have treated your helmet, over time  the outer shell can become cracked or brittle, the straps and other components can wear out and break. Also, how and where you store your helmet can affect its longevity. For these reasons, the CPSC recommends replacing your helmet every 5-10 years1. This will also ensure that your helmet has the current safety features and design. In the event of a fall, your helmet MUST be replaced. The inner protective foam is designed to compress upon impact in order to absorb the force and protect your head. Bicycle helmets are designed for single impact protection, just like car seats. Once the foam has compressed, it no longer provides protection. Even if there is no visible damage to the helmet, the foam inside may be damaged. There is currently no recycling program for old bike helmets. As with car seats, cut the straps before discarding so that it cannot be used again. Or, come up with creative ways to reuse your old helmets. Flower pots seem to be a popular option! 1. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. (2019, December 31) Which Helmet for Which Activity? https://ift.tt/3ae9R0h #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
14.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Ensuring a Proper Fit :: A helmet provides great protection to a cyclist’s head but only when worn properly. It is important to always check the position of your helmet as well as the tightness of the chin strap before every ride. A helmet should be positioned across the forehead only 1-2 finger widths above your eyebrows. Wearing your helmet pushed back on the crown of your head will not provide adequate protection in the event of a fall. The straps should form a V-shape under your ears and only 1 finger should fit between the chin strap and your chin. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has created a great visual guide for ensuring proper sizing and fit. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
13.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Selecting a Bike Helmet All helmets sold in the US must pass the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standard (1) . The CPSC standard requires that helmets significantly reduce the impact forces to a cyclist’s head in the event of impact. Bicycle helmets were originally designed to protect against major head trauma and fatality. Recently, there has been a shift in focus to also protecting cyclists from concussion. Bicycling related accidents rank among the top causes of concussions treated in emergency rooms across the US (2). Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed the STAR system to evaluate protection from concussion in the event of impact (3). The STAR system combines additional testing with the CPSC testing protocol resulting in a more robust safety testing system. So far they have evaluated 112 helmets using the STAR equation and have created a searchable website to help you in selecting your next helmet. (1) U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. (2019, April 10) Bicycle Helmets Business Guidance. https://ift.tt/2eTU6ls (2) Coronado, V. G., Haileyesus, T., Cheng, T. A., Bell, J. M., Haarbauer-Krupa, J., Lionbarger, M. R., ... & Gilchrist, J. (2015). Trends in sports-and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries treated in US emergency departments: the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) 2001-2012. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation, 30(3), 185. (3)Bland, M. L., McNally, C., Zuby, D. S., Mueller, B. C., & Rowson, S. (2020). Development of the STAR evaluation system for assessing bicycle helmet protective performance. Annals of biomedical engineering, 48(1), 47-57. DOI https://ift.tt/2PT7wRs #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
12.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
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from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Importance of a Helmet Bike helmets serve an important role in bike safety. According to the National Safety Council, head injuries account for 1/3 of all non-fatal bike related injuries (1). Research has found that bike helmets are highly effective in reducing the rates of serious head injuries related to cycling (2). The following infographic hipghlights the safety benefits of helmets and why you should wear one every time you ride. (1) National Safety Council. (2019, May 6) Bicycle Safety Statistics May Surprise You. https://ift.tt/3mGSMkj (2) Høye, A. (2018). Bicycle helmets–To wear or not to wear? A meta-analyses of the effects of bicycle helmets on injuries. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 117, 85-97. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
09.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Where do you ride? Where are some of your favorite places to ride? Do you have a favorite stretch of road? A great bike trail? Around your neighborhood? We’d love to know where Batavians bike! Share in the comments below. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad
08.04.2021
Batavia Bicycle Commission
No comments
from Batavia Bicycle Commission Link to FB Where to Ride in the Lane When riding on the road, cyclists should ride to the right-hand side of the lane whenever possible. Under Illinois law, a cyclist is allowed to ride on the shoulder, but is not required to do so. When riding with traffic, a cyclist is permitted to move toward the center of the lane to avoid debris, rough surfaces or other hazards that may be present. In addition, a cyclist can and should move over to avoid parked cars, leaving additional clearance for vehicle doors to open without hitting them. Illinois law (625 ILCS 5/11-1505) outlines additional conditions where a cyclist is legally allowed in the center or the lane or left of center. The first situation is when the cyclist intends to make a left turn. For a left turn, the cyclist should move to the left side of the lane and signal the intent to turn. Another situation occurs as a cyclist approaches an intersection. In this case, the cyclist should move toward the center of the lane. This would prevent a vehicle planning to turn right from passing the cyclist and possibly causing a collision. Finally, when a cyclist is able to travel at posted traffic speeds, the cyclist is permitted to ride near the center of the lane. This situation often occurs in downtown areas with lower speed limits as well as when travelling down hills. Road signage is beginning to pop-up in places where it is likely that bicycles will travel in the center of the lane. These signs will benefit both cyclists and motorists by alerting all traffic to look for and expect to see bicycles in the lane. #BikeBatavia, #BikeSafety, #ShareTheRoad

Bike Safety Quiz

Whether you are a cyclist or a motorist, learn more about bike safety by taking the Ride Illinois online Bike Safety Quiz.

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